Calcium... important throughout life

It’s never too late to make sure your bones are getting the right amount of calcium so they stay healthy and strong.  While calcium is important to all of us, it is particularly important to young children and women.  CALSURA tablets are easily absorbed by children and are a great-tasting way to incorporate it into their diets. 

Young children absorb the most calcium during their bone-forming years and can only achieve their maximum bone mass with adequate calcium consumption.  Calcium intake for women is exceedingly important as they age. Women are most susceptible to osteoporosis, a disease caused by bone deterioration.  Amazingly, one out of two women over the age of 35 may suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture during her life time. The best calcium supplement for women is one that is absorbed quickly and completely by the body, maximizing its benefits. 

 

GETTING ENOUGH CALCIUM?

Maybe, but recent surveys show over 80% of young and adult women are below the recommended intakes for calcium.  Whatever the age, adequate calcium intake is an investment in the continued health and strength of your bones.

The recommended daily amount you should consume is expressed in milligrams (mg), while calcium content on food labels is expressed as a percentage of Daily Value (% DV).  The table below shows how you can achieve your target intake level by drinking CALSURA.


"About 75% of boys and 90-95% of teenage girls consume less than the recommended amount of calcium."


  *Recommended daily intake refers to the total amount of calcium you receive from all sources, including foods, supplements and drinking water. Source: Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluoride, Institute of Medicine, National Academy Press, 1997.

 

*Recommended daily intake refers to the total amount of calcium you receive from all sources, including foods, supplements and drinking water. Source: Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluoride, Institute of Medicine, National Academy Press, 1997.

Too much calcium and kidney stones?

Calcium is a fairly innocuous mineral and its absorption is well regulated by the body. The National Academy of Sciences has set a tolerable upper intake level of 2500 mg per day for individuals one year and older.

Kidney stones are crystals that can cause obstruction of urine flow, bleeding and localized damage of kidney tissues.  People with kidney stones are frequently counseled by doctors to reduce their dietary calcium intake. The rationale for this advice is more intuitive than empirical in nature.  Despite encouraging low calcium intake, there is no data showing that dietary calcium causes stones.

In fact, a recent study published in 1997 of 91,731 nurses exploring the relationship between calcium supplements and kidney stones found that a high intake of dietary calcium reduces the risk of kidney stones but supplemental calcium increases the risk.  This myth of calcium and kidney stones was first debunked by a NIH study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1993.  It was found that higher calcium intakes did not increase the risk of stones but a significant inverse relationship was true.  That is to say, the greater the calcium intake, the less likely the chance of developing kidney stones (34% lower risk in men and 35% lower risk in women). 


"Low calcium intake 
increases the risk for
kidney stones."